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replicaEach of these precious beads is sold as a single bead, for $6.50* (or 20% less if you use your friends & fans discount, SAVE20). If you are interested in more or the whole set, please let us know!

These are modern handcrafted beads made in the tradition of ancient dZi beads (pronounced ZEE). Few beads are surrounded by as much myth and mystery as the dZi bead. The authentic/original etched agates are found in Tibet, Bhutan, Ladakh, and Nepal, and are believed to be about two thousand years old. Many legends accompany the beads- that they were not made by man but created by the gods, that they bring luck and ward off evil, that they protect the wearer from physical harm by taking the abuse upon themselves, and that the bead itself will choose its' owner and will not stay with an unlucky person. 

We actually acquired these in India, but we believe they are every bit as beautiful, with their rich Carnelian color and traditional etched designs. We have several in a variety of colors, so let us know if you want additional photos. If you purchase from this posting, you will receive one like that shown in the two close-up shots, unless you specify otherwise.

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blue malaI’ve long been fascinated by the myriad uses and celebrations of beads – whether they be used for beauty & ornamentation, décor, prayer & worship, communication, currency, magic, and more. One use I sat down to learn more about this weekend is the Mala string of beads used to count mantras (Sanskrit prayers), a chanting of the type used as a spiritual tool in virtually every cultural and religious tradition.

Mala beads can be necklaces, bracelets or meditation garlands, and have been worn for thousands of years by yogis and spiritual seekers from all over the world. They were first created in India 3000 years ago, and have roots in Hinduism, Buddhism and yoga. Originally, they were used for a special style of meditation called Japa, which means “to recite”.

During a Japa meditation, you repeat a mantra softly, 108 times, using your mala beads to keep track. (Something like the practice of saying a rosary.) A mantra is a word or sound repeated during meditation to help you concentrate. The number 108 is an auspicious and spiritually significant number, for several reasons:

  • There are said to be a total of 108 energy lines converging to form the heart chakra;
  • It is believed that there are 108 Upanishads, texts of wisdom from the ancient sages;
  • Some say that 1 stands for God or higher Truth, 0 stands for emptiness or completeness in spiritual practice, and 8 stands for infinity or eternity;
  • There are said to be 108 earthly desires;
  • Some say there are 108 feelings – 36 related to the past, 36 related to the present, and the 36 related to the future;
  • In astrology, there are 12 houses and 9 planets. 12 times 9 equals 108;
  • There are said to be 108 Indian goddess names; and finally,
  • The diameter of the Sun is 108 times the diameter of the Earth. The distance from the Sun to the Earth is 108 times the diameter of the Sun.

Believers say that Mala beads can be used in a variety of ways to help you manifest and achieve your dreams and desires. They suggest giving your mala an intention or mantra. If you’ve never done this before and you’re interested, you can check out this article on the subject. Simply put, setting an intention is just consciously being clear and expressing what you want out of life in a particular moment or period of time, whether it be spiritual, physical or material. Once you’ve given your mala an intention you can use it during your meditation practice to keep you focused and on track. You may wear your mala around your neck or clasp it firmly in your palms as you tune in and focus on your breath.

red mala

amazonite mala

Often, malas are made of seeds, sandalwood or rosewood, and some incorporate a crystal or healing stone. The beautiful mala featured at the top right of this post is from a cool site called Tiny Devotions. It is made of: a) Amazonite, which some believe inspires true peace and freedom; b) Moonstone, which they say carries the energy of strength, wisdom and intuition; and c) Rudraksha seeds, known for their protective and healing elements.

Even if yoga and meditation aren’t your thing, simply wearing a mala can help you feel good and manifest what you’re looking for – in the same manner as visualizations and the power of positive thinking. And no matter what, there’s no denying the beauty in some of the other beautiful Mala creations I found from some of my favorite Etsy colleagues. Shown here are: 1) (to the right) a Red Tiger's Eye and Swarovsky crystal Japa Mala, from AmanoBella and 2) (to the left), a Mala necklace with quartz point and Amazonite, from Garden of Earthly Delights.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy Greek Worry Beads, Beads of Passion and/or Crystals

Until Next Time - Sheila

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments   

+2 # Ellen W Gonchar 2016-08-30 17:08
Great blog......very interesting!
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0 # Somclaughlin 2016-08-30 17:35
Thank you so much, sweet Ellen!!!
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+1 # Linda Britt 2016-08-31 17:26
Lots of interesting info. Thanks for expanding my knowledge.
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0 # Somclaughlin 2016-08-31 19:11
Thank you so much, Linda!
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